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ginger

Tatsoi with Ginger & Green Garlic

TIME: 30 MINUTES (not including optional marinating time), SERVES: 4

Tatsoi is one of my favorite Asian greens to both grow and eat. Similar to bok choy with its mild, mustard flavor, it has a more tender, spinach-like leaf. Paired with ginger and green garlic, this is a particularly special Spring treat. We grow it in the Fall as well, where garlic cloves can be substituted for green garlic.

INGREDIENTS

1 - 2 lbs. Tatsoi, ends removed
2 tbls. fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 tbls. green garlic, tender white parts minced (tops reserved for stock), or 2 - 3 garlic cloves, minced
3 tbls. Nama Shoyu, tamari or soy sauce
1 - 2 tbls. fish sauce
1 tbls. rice wine vinegar
1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
2 tbls. Wildbrine Spicy Kimchi Sriracha (or kimchi brine, or 1 tbls. regular Sriracha)
1 tbls. toasted sesame seeds, to garnish (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil.

  2. Blanch the tatsoi for 1 minute, stirring to fully submerge. Remove from boiling water with a slotted spoon or tongs and immediately place in a large bowl of cold water. Drain in a colander and chop into bite sized pieces.

  3. Mix the remaining ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the tatsoi and toss to coat. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes to soak up the flavors.

  4. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds; Serve cold. Delicious the next day as well.

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Gingery Kale & Mushrooms with Coconut-Fried Eggs

TIME: 30 MINUTES; SERVES: 4

I made this recipe in the Spring from last season’s frozen and thawed tomatoes, but if you make it in the Fall, you have the possibility of sourcing fresh Kneehigh Farm ginger and turmeric as well! I particularly like curly green kale here, but Swiss chard or hardy spinach would be delicious as well. Substitute the coconut-fried eggs for a nice piece of fish and you’ve got a nourishing, simple dinner that’s on the table in 30 minutes.

INGREDIENTS

4 - 5 small heirloom or plum tomatoes, or 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
2 tbls. olive oil
4 cloves garlic, slivered
1-inch piece ginger, peeled & minced
1/4-inch piece turmeric, peeled & minced
2 dried hot chili peppers, minced (seeds included) or 1/4 - 1/2 tsp. red chili flakes
2 tbls. coconut oil
1 bunch curly green kale (or other hardy green), chopped
2 cups crimini or shiitake mushrooms, sliced
1 lime, juiced
1 tbls. Nama Shoyu or soy sauce
1 tsp. fish sauce (opt.)
1/4 cup cilantro, chopped
Salt & fresh ground black pepper to taste
Coconut-Fried Eggs
1 tbls. coconut oil
2 tbls. unsweetened, shredded coconut
4 eggs

METHOD

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Place the tomatoes on a baking sheet, toss with 2 tbls. olive oil and salt. Roast for 15 minutes until slightly blistered.

  2. In a large, heavy-bottom pan, heat 2 tbls. coconut oil over medium heat. Add the garlic, ginger, turmeric, red chili flakes, and a dash of salt. Cook for a few minutes until fragrant.

  3. Add the mushrooms and cook until softened.

  4. Add the kale, cover, and cook until softened. If it becomes dry or starts to burn, add a little water. Cook until the greens are almost tender, then add the lime juice, soy sauce, and fish sauce.

  5. Add the roasted tomatoes with their juices and gently stir. Remove from heat and sprinkle cilantro on top.

  6. Coconut-fried eggs: In a separate pan, heat 1 tbls. coconut oil over medium-low heat.

  7. When the oil is hot, sprinkle the shredded coconut into the pan and quickly crack the eggs over it.

  8. Cover with a lid and fry until the whites are cooked through, but the yolk is still slightly runny. The edges should be crisp.

  9. Top each serving of greens with a fried egg and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Smashed Persian Cucumbers with Sesame & Ginger

TIME: 20 MINUTES, SERVES: 4
Adapted from Bon Appetit

Persian cucumbers have become very popular among our customers and chefs. Their small size and thin skins make them perfect for easy snacking or quick prep. They are surprisingly sweet and crunchy, while still retaining a refreshing, cucumber flavor.

Smashing cucumbers (my new alt. rock band name) is fun! It is also a great way to involve kids in the kitchen. But it’s not just about fun and games—the craggy edges have more surface area for seasonings, packing every mouthful full of flavor.

INGREDIENTS

5 - 6 small, Persian cucumbers
1 tsp. kosher salt, plus more to taste
2 scallions, trimmed, white and green parts sliced
2 tbls. rice wine vinegar
1/2 tsp. grated ginger
2 tsp. sesame seeds, toasted (a mix of white and black are nice)
Chili oil, to taste (look for a brand without additives or MSG—just chilies and oil preferably—or make your own!)

METHOD

  1. Tear cucumbers into bite size pieces.

  2. Place the cucumbers plus 1 tsp. kosher salt in a colander, and let drain for 10 minutes.

  3. Place sesame seeds in a small pan and toast until they start to pop, about 3 - 5 minutes. Stir to avoid burning, and remove from heat.

  4. Transfer the cucumbers to a medium bowl and add rice wine vinegar and grated ginger. Toss to coat and adjust seasoning.

  5. Transfer cucumbers to a serving dish, sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and drizzle with chili oil.

Ginger-Cinnamon Hazelnut Butter

TIME: 30 MINUTES; SERVES: 3/4 CUP
Adapted from the ‘Minimalist Baker’

If you have a high-quality food processor or blender, you can make your own nut butters in a matter of minutes. Another bonus is that you can add or subtract any spices or flavorings you wish, and use any kind of nut or seed.

INGREDIENTS

1 cup raw hazelnuts
1/2 tsp. Ceylon cinnamon
1/2 tsp. powdered ginger
A dash of salt
A sprinkle of chili powder (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Spread hazelnuts on a baking sheet and toast for about 12 minutes, until dark brown—but not burnt—and fragrant.

  2. Remove from oven and let cool slightly—the skins slip off more easily if cool. Transfer to a large kitchen towel, fold over the nuts, and roll them around to remove most of the skins. Fewer skins will produce a creamier nut butter.

  3. Place skinned hazelnuts in a food processor. Purée until a butter begins to form, scraping down the sides as needed.

  4. Once it is creamy and smooth, add the ground cinnamon, ginger, chili powder, and salt. Purée again until mixed. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.

  5. Transfer to a jar and store in the refrigerator.

Ginger-Turmeric Sauerkraut

TIME: 20 MINUTES, plus ~1 week fermentation; SERVES: 1 QUART

I add a couple tablespoons of sauerkraut to almost every meal I eat. Purchasing living, small-batch ‘kraut can run you upwards of $8, but making it can cost as little as $1 (and it’s more fun to see it bubbling happily in your kitchen!) I love this recipe primarily for its vibrant color and flavor. However, the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric and digestive-aid from ginger are definitely a plus. Don’t forget to include a few grinds of fresh black pepper to fully assimilate the benefits of turmeric.

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds green cabbage (1 medium head) cored and finely chopped or shaved on a mandolin
1 tbls. + 1 tsp. kosher salt (non-iodized)
Fresh ground black pepper, to taste
A pinch crushed red pepper flakes (opt.)
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled & grated
1/2 - 1-inch piece fresh turmeric, grated (or 1/2 - 1 tsp. ground)

METHOD

  1. Combine cabbage and salt in a bowl. Massage for about 5 minutes until juices are released and the cabbage significantly decreases in volume. *A general salt ratio is about 2 tsp. per pound of cabbage. You want the cabbage to be too salty to eat enjoyably, but not inedible. Add more salt if necessary, and taste often. If you add an excess of salt, the ‘kraut will not ferment because it will inhibit all bacteria growth—good and bad. If you add too little, funky bacteria can infect your batch and turn it soggy or gross.

  2. Once you’re confident with the salt ratio, add the remaining ingredients and mix to thoroughly combine.

  3. Pack into a quart-sized mason jar. There should be plenty of natural brine to cover the cabbage if you massaged enough.

  4. Weigh down the cabbage so it is fully submerged by the brine. I like to use Masontops glass pickle weights. You can also use a clean rock or a smaller jar.

  5. You can cover with a clean cloth & rubber band (so fruit flies can’t get in), but it’s worth investing in pickle pipes! (Also available at Masontops). These silicone airlocks allow pressure to vent without exposure to oxygen. Make sure to place your jar on a plate to catch the brine that bubbles out.

  6. Keep in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight. Depending on temperature, you will notice your ‘kraut bubbling in a day or two. Let it do its thing, making sure the cabbage is still submerged in brine for 5 - 7 days. Taste often. Once it is pleasantly sour and no longer too salty, remove the weight and transfer to the fridge with a tight fitting lid. Will keep for months, although I’m sure you’ll be whipping up another batch in no time.

Smoked trout and fried eggs with ‘kraut

Smoked trout and fried eggs with ‘kraut

Coconut-Cauliflower Soup with Ginger-Scallion Relish

TIME: 30 MINUTES; SERVES: 6
Adapted from NYT Cooking

The ginger-scallion relish is the shining star in this recipe. This dairy-free, creamy cauliflower soup is a staple in my kitchen, and can be dressed up or down in a variety of ways. The combination of coconut, lime, cilantro, scallion & ginger can’t be beat, and the cauliflower provides a lighter, dairy-free base for the flavors to meld.

INGREDIENTS

3 tbls. unrefined coconut oil
1 lemongrass stalk, tough outer peel removed, inner portion slit to release flavor
2-inch piece ginger, peeled and finely minced or gated, about 3 tbls.
1 large yellow onion, chopped
1 medium head cauliflower, chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
3 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 can full-fat coconut milk, or 1 small can coconut cream
A few dashes fish sauce (opt.)
Salt & fresh ground black pepper, to taste
4 - 6 scallions, trimmed, green & white parts thinly sliced
3 tbls. cilantro, chopped
2 tbls. sherry vinegar
2 limes, zest & juice
1/3 - 1/2 cup oil (neutral or olive)

METHOD

  1. In a large soup pot or dutch oven, heat the coconut oil over medium heat. Add the onion, lemongrass, half the ginger, and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. 

  2. Stir in the cauliflower and garlic, then add the stock. Bring to a boil over high, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until the cauliflower is very tender, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.

  3. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the remaining ginger with the scallions, cilantro, vinegar, lime zest and juice, and oil. Whisk together and season with optional fish sauce and salt. Adjust seasonings and set aside.

  4. Remove the lemongrass stalk from the soup. Working in batches in a high-powered blender, purée the soup until very smooth. Add the coconut milk/cream & additional stock or water to thin if necessary. Season to taste with salt, pepper and optional fish sauce.

  5. Serve the soup topped with the ginger-scallion relish.

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Baby Bok Choy with Sesame & Ginger

TIME: 20 MINUTES; SERVES: 4+

We exclusively grow baby Bok Choy varieties at Kneehigh Farm, because we love their mild mustard flavor and workable size. They’re delicious raw, stir fried, grilled, braised, etc.. By halving or quartering them, you get the best of both worlds in each bite: crunchy, refreshing stalk + silky leaves.

Bok Choy is a cool weather crop, so we enjoy it early in the Spring or Fall before frost. This dish is delicious paired with rice, chicken, and a scoop of kimchi for a simple dinner.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound baby Bok Choy
1 1/2 tbls. tamari or Nama Shoyu (soy sauce)
1 tbls. Chinese shaoxing wine, or rice wine vinegar
A few splashes fish sauce (opt.)
1/2 tsp. Sambal Oelek (red chili paste, opt.)
1 tbls. neutral, high-heat oil (refined coconut, avocado, high-oleic sunflower…)
1 garlic clove, minced
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled & minced
1 - 2 tsp. toasted sesame oil
Toasted sesame seeds, to garnish
Scallions, to garnish (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Trim bottoms from the baby Bok Choy. If small enough, quarter lengthwise, rinse, and pat dry. If larger, separate the leaves, rinse & dry.

  2. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, Chinese wine or rice wine vinegar, optional chili paste and fish sauce. Set aside.

  3. Heat the neutral oil in large skillet over medium-high heat until a splash of water sizzles. Add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry until fragrant, 20 - 30 seconds. Add the Bok Choy and stir-fry for 2 minutes longer, until crisp-tender. Add the soy sauce mixture and cook for another 30 seconds. Turn off the heat, drizzle with sesame oil, and toss to coat.

  4. Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle with sesame seeds & scallions.

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Creamy Winter Squash Soup with Coconut & Ginger

TIME: 30 - 45 MINUTES (not including roasting time); SERVES: 6+

This soup can be made with almost any type of winter squash. I prefer to use Kabocha because of its starchy, chestnut-like texture and flavor, but dense Butternut or Delicata does wonders as well. I would eat this soup all Winter if I could grow & store enough squash to satisfy my cravings.

*Go with a high-powered blender or food processor, rather than an immersion blender, for the silkiest texture.

INGREDIENTS

1 medium-large winter squash; roasted, flesh scooped out & reserved (about 2 cups)
2 tbls. unrefined coconut oil or ghee/butter
1 large yellow or white onion (or 1 - 2 leeks), chopped
1 - 2 fennel and/or celery stalks, or 1 fennel bulb (opt.), chopped
1 - 3 carrots (opt.), chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1-inch piece ginger, peeled & grated
Water, vegetable broth, or chicken stock (amount depends on desired consistency)
1, 14-oz. can full-fat coconut milk
~1/4 tsp. each coriander, ground turmeric, & Ceylon cinnamon
A pinch of cayenne pepper
Juice from 1/2 - 1 lime (depending on size; to taste)
1 tsp. fish sauce (opt.)
Kosher salt & fresh ground black pepper, to taste
Cilantro, chopped
Greek yogurt or crème fraîche

METHOD

  1. Heat coconut oil or ghee/butter in a large dutch oven or soup pot. When hot enough to sizzle water, add the onions, optional fennel, celery & carrots, garlic, ginger, & spices. Cook until browned & fragrant.

  2. Add the coconut milk and roasted winter squash. Add enough water or stock to barely cover. (You can always add more liquid, but it’s hard to cook the soup down once it’s too thin without adding more squash.)

  3. Cover and simmer on low until soft and thoroughly cooked through, about 20 minutes. Stir often to avoid sticking.

  4. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Transfer carefully in batches to the blender or food processor and purée until creamy.

  5. Adjust seasonings: add the lime, optional fish sauce, and salt & pepper to taste.

  6. Ladle into bowls and garnish with chopped cilantro and yogurt or crème fraîche.

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