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garlic

Tatsoi with Ginger & Green Garlic

TIME: 30 MINUTES (not including optional marinating time), SERVES: 4

Tatsoi is one of my favorite Asian greens to both grow and eat. Similar to bok choy with its mild, mustard flavor, it has a more tender, spinach-like leaf. Paired with ginger and green garlic, this is a particularly special Spring treat. We grow it in the Fall as well, where garlic cloves can be substituted for green garlic.

INGREDIENTS

1 - 2 lbs. Tatsoi, ends removed
2 tbls. fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 tbls. green garlic, tender white parts minced (tops reserved for stock), or 2 - 3 garlic cloves, minced
3 tbls. Nama Shoyu, tamari or soy sauce
1 - 2 tbls. fish sauce
1 tbls. rice wine vinegar
1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
2 tbls. Wildbrine Spicy Kimchi Sriracha (or kimchi brine, or 1 tbls. regular Sriracha)
1 tbls. toasted sesame seeds, to garnish (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil.

  2. Blanch the tatsoi for 1 minute, stirring to fully submerge. Remove from boiling water with a slotted spoon or tongs and immediately place in a large bowl of cold water. Drain in a colander and chop into bite sized pieces.

  3. Mix the remaining ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the tatsoi and toss to coat. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes to soak up the flavors.

  4. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds; Serve cold. Delicious the next day as well.

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Roasted Zucchini with Whole Garlic, Lemon & Fried Sage Leaves

TIME: 45 MINUTES, SERVES: 4

The impetus for this recipe was having to thin our sage plants in the greenhouse. I’ve never been one to cook much with fresh sage, but when I had a handful of the most tender, baby leaves, I knew I had to figure something out! Now, I am so glad we decided to grow this herb because I immediately fell in love with the delicate, crispy addition of fried sage leaves to just about any dish.

When the season is in full swing, and the zucchini need harvesting every 2 days, this meal is perfect for a quick, no-fuss dinner. Especially if you have a couple pounds of bone-in chicken thighs to roast—nestle them together and bake all at once.

INGREDIENTS

4 medium-sized zucchini, cut in half lengthwise and then quartered (or cut into thirds to make similar sized spears)
2 heads garlic, cut in half crosswise (to expose the center of each clove)
2 lemons, quartered
1/4 tsp. ground turmeric
Salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste
2 tbls. avocado oil or high-heat oil
Fried Sage Leaves
1 bunch fresh sage leaves
2 tbls. avocado oil or high-heat oil

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.

  2. Toss the first 6 ingredients together on a large sheet pan to coat, being mindful as to not dislodge the garlic cloves from the heads. Before placing the sheet pan in the oven, arrange the garlic heads cut-side down on the pan.

  3. Roast for 30 minutes or so, until the garlic cloves have softened and the zucchini & lemons are tender and browned.

  4. While the veggies are roasting, heat the remaining 2 tbls. of high-heat oil in a wide saucepan or frying pan. When the oil is hot, drop the sage leaves in, careful not overcrowd them (you may have to do several batches). Fry for a few minutes until browned and crispy. Keep a close eye on them because this can happen quickly! Remove from the oil with a slotted spoon or spatula and place on a paper towel to cool.

  5. When the veggies are ready for serving, sprinkle the crispy sage over top.

    *If serving alongside roast chicken, scatter the veggies around 4 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs and roast at 325°F for about 45 minutes, or until the chicken registers at 160-165°F.

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Braised Greens with Tomatoes & Leeks

TIME: 1 HOUR; SERVES: 6 - 8
Adapted from Bon Appetit

This dish is the perfect companion to crispy chicken on a frigid Fall evening (ideally after a light frost when the greens get shocked into sweetness). In late September, when I’m sick of canning tomatoes, I’ll toss the last couple harvests into my chest freezer. This has become my preferred preserving method, because when I take them out to thaw, the skins easily slip off, releasing their liquid and further concentrating their flavor. I used a variety called Jaune Flamme in this recipe— a small, bright orange heirloom that is exceptionally sweet, but still packs a tangy punch. Smoky paprika and melting leeks make this a substantial dish on its own, particularly if sprinkled with pine nuts and crumbled goat cheese.

INGREDIENTS

2 tbls. high-heat oil or bacon grease
2 bunches hardy greens (kale, dandelion, collards, etc.), stems removed or finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped
1 yellow onion, chopped
1 large leek, cut in half lengthwise and rinsed clean, chopped into half moons
3 cloves garlic, peeled & slivered
1/2 tsp. smoked paprika
2+ tsp. red wine or sherry vinegar
1 1/2 cups bone broth (chicken, pork, or veggie)
1/2 cup stewed or roasted tomatoes, cooked down
Salt & fresh ground black pepper to taste
Pine nuts & goat cheese, to serve (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Heat oil or bacon grease in a large, heavy bottom pan over medium heat.

  2. when the pan is hot enough to sizzle water, add the onions, leek, and garlic. Cook until softened, about 7 - 10 minutes.

  3. Add the tomatoes & paprika, and cook for another 5 minutes, watching carefully to avoid burning. Season with salt and pepper.

  4. Add the broth & vinegar, and bring to a boil.

  5. Add the greens in batches. Stir to incorporate, and simmer until tender, 20 - 30 minutes, partially uncovered. Season again to taste, and garnish.

Topped with pine nuts and Turmeric-Ginger Sauerkraut

Topped with pine nuts and Turmeric-Ginger Sauerkraut

Pickled Garlic Scapes

TIME: 20 MINUTES (not including optional canning); SERVES: 1 PINT (multiply by 8 to can a full hot water bath)

Garlic scapes are among the most highly anticipated Spring offerings. Like peas and strawberries, they are fleeting—moreso because there is just one harvest from each garlic plant. The flavor is milder and sweeter than garlic cloves, with a tender crunch. They can be used fresh or lightly sautéed in any dish you would otherwise use cloves, but they truly shine when bathed in brine.

*A little growing knowledge: For storage garlic, cloves are planted in the Fall and left to overwinter. In the Spring, the clove shoots up a green stalk and continues to flesh out its bulb. Before the bulb is fully formed, the plant will reveal its flower—or garlic “scape”—this must be harvested off each plant before fully open to prevent the bulb from shattering, rendering it useless.

Because of the need to promptly harvest every scape, growers usually have a one-time bounty. I try to can at least a dozen or so jars to give as gifts throughout the season. If you don’t grow garlic, and just want to make a single batch, this recipe can be adapted as a refrigerator pickle (no need to bust out the hot water bath). Just allow the flavors to meld for a few weeks before serving. Pickled scapes are an amazing addition to an hors d’oeuvres platter, alongside sharp cheese and cured meat.

INGREDIENTS

About 2 - 3 bunches garlic scapes (1/2 pound)
1/2 tsp. mustard seeds
1/2 tsp. black peppercorns
1/4 tsp. coriander seeds
1 bay leaf
1 whole dried chili, or 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes
1 whole dill head, or 1 tsp. dill seed
3/4 cup apple cider vinegar (5% acidity)
3/4 cup water
1 tbls. kosher salt (non-iodized)

METHOD

  1. Wash the scapes. Trim off tough ends and blossoms (you can save these bits for stock).

  2. Place all the spices into a sterilized mason jar, minus the salt. Stuff the garlic scapes into the jar, either by trimming to size, or wrapping them around in a circular pattern, and then filling in the center.

  3. Heat the vinegar, water, and salt in a saucepan until boiling. Pour into the jar.

  4. From here you can continue with processing in a hot water bath for 10 minutes to make shelf-stable pickles, or simply put a tight fitting lid on the jar and set in the fridge for a couple weeks before tasting.

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Turmeric-Cauliflower with Smashed Garlic & Herbs

TIME: 30 MINUTES; SERVES: 5 - 6
Adapted from Alison Roman

I make a version of this dish at least once a week when cauliflower is in season. The herbs add a fresh, grassy flavor that compliment the more pungent garlic & spices, and the cauliflower takes on a beautiful golden hue from the turmeric. Don’t fret if some of your cauliflower slices crumble apart—they become the highly sought-after crispy bits.

INGREDIENTS

1 medium head cauliflower
6 - 8 cloves garlic (depending on size), smashed
3 tbls. olive oil, plus more for serving
1 tsp. each fennel & cumin seed
Pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp. ground turmeric
Kosher salt & fresh ground black pepper, to taste
1/2 cup mixed herbs: parsley, cilantro, dill, mint; roughly chopped
1 - 2 oz. feta cheese (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Heat oven to 425°F.

  2. Slice cauliflower from top to bottom into 1/2 inch thick slices, including the core and inner leaves.

  3. Place cauliflower and garlic on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with fennel & cumin seed, turmeric and crushed red pepper flakes. Season with salt and pepper.

  4. Roast until cauliflower has turned a deep golden brown and is slightly crispy, 25 to 30 minutes. Flip the larger “steaks”, stir the smaller bits around and continue to roast until completely browned, another 8 - 10 minutes.

  5. Remove from heat and top with herbs, optional feta, and a drizzle of olive oil.

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Baby Bok Choy with Sesame & Ginger

TIME: 20 MINUTES; SERVES: 4+

We exclusively grow baby Bok Choy varieties at Kneehigh Farm, because we love their mild mustard flavor and workable size. They’re delicious raw, stir fried, grilled, braised, etc.. By halving or quartering them, you get the best of both worlds in each bite: crunchy, refreshing stalk + silky leaves.

Bok Choy is a cool weather crop, so we enjoy it early in the Spring or Fall before frost. This dish is delicious paired with rice, chicken, and a scoop of kimchi for a simple dinner.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound baby Bok Choy
1 1/2 tbls. tamari or Nama Shoyu (soy sauce)
1 tbls. Chinese shaoxing wine, or rice wine vinegar
A few splashes fish sauce (opt.)
1/2 tsp. Sambal Oelek (red chili paste, opt.)
1 tbls. neutral, high-heat oil (refined coconut, avocado, high-oleic sunflower…)
1 garlic clove, minced
1-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled & minced
1 - 2 tsp. toasted sesame oil
Toasted sesame seeds, to garnish
Scallions, to garnish (opt.)

METHOD

  1. Trim bottoms from the baby Bok Choy. If small enough, quarter lengthwise, rinse, and pat dry. If larger, separate the leaves, rinse & dry.

  2. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, Chinese wine or rice wine vinegar, optional chili paste and fish sauce. Set aside.

  3. Heat the neutral oil in large skillet over medium-high heat until a splash of water sizzles. Add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry until fragrant, 20 - 30 seconds. Add the Bok Choy and stir-fry for 2 minutes longer, until crisp-tender. Add the soy sauce mixture and cook for another 30 seconds. Turn off the heat, drizzle with sesame oil, and toss to coat.

  4. Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle with sesame seeds & scallions.

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